About the Author

Rhea Thomas

Economist

Rhea is an Economist at Wilmington Trust, responsible for monitoring and analyzing economic developments in domestic and international economies.

Prior to joining Wilmington Trust, Rhea served as Vice President in Foreign Exchange Sales at Lehman Brothers, where she provided primary sales coverage to institutional clients. Earlier in her career, she focused on foreign exchange research, where she helped to build models and write publications to explain currency market movements and trade ideas.

Rhea holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics and International Studies with Distinction from Yale University.


By the Author

The European Central Bank’s Dovish Surprise: Pushing on a String

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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March 8, 2019— The European Central Bank (ECB) surprised markets yesterday with an earlier-than-expected announcement of policies intended to support growth in the face of persistent downside risks to the eurozone economy. The ECB’s actions might suggest the possibility of reacceleration in the eurozone economy after a marked slowdown in 2018.

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Pushing the (national debt) limit

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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March 1, 2019— On March 2, the specter of the country’s swollen debt levels (the accumulation of budget deficits and surpluses over history) will return to the forefront of market attention once again, as the federal government approaches the deadline for reinstatement of the debt ceiling (the limit on government borrowing set by Congress).

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Fed hikes rates, but signals slower and more uncertain path of hikes for the future

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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December 20, 2018 – The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) hiked the target Fed Funds rate as expected yesterday by 25 basis points from 2.25% to 2.50%.  The statement and press conference suggested that the outlook for the U.S. economy was one of decelerating but still solid growth, underscored by labor market tightness. However, it also highlighted, as we expected, that the Fed will likely have to slow its pace of hikes in 2019 and is more uncertain about the path of hikes going forward.

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