About the Author

Rhea Thomas

Economist

Rhea is an Economist at Wilmington Trust, responsible for monitoring and analyzing economic developments in domestic and international economies.

Prior to joining Wilmington Trust, Rhea served as Vice President in Foreign Exchange Sales at Lehman Brothers, where she provided primary sales coverage to institutional clients. Earlier in her career, she focused on foreign exchange research, where she helped to build models and write publications to explain currency market movements and trade ideas.

Rhea holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics and International Studies with Distinction from Yale University.


By the Author

Labor Market Hitting a Speed Bump, Still Expecting a Winding Road Ahead

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
JariJ

August 11, 2020—Over the past few months, the labor market has started the process of recovery after a sharp downward lurch in the aftermath of pandemic-induced shutdowns. The July employment report showed a third month of job gains, but at a slower pace relative to May and June, and was the first of a number of speed bumps we expect in the months ahead. We look for the recovery to continue, but not necessarily in a straight line.

Read More...


Labor Market in a Deep Ditch; a Bumpy Road Ahead

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
Jean Landry

June 19, 2020—It’s official.  The longest economic expansion in U.S. history back to 1854 ended in February 2020, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).[i] The coronavirus pandemic ended an expansion that chugged along for ten years and eight months, as business closures and social-distancing measures to contain the outbreak brought economic output to a screeching halt in the span of just two months.

Read More...


Damage Control: The Economic Fallout of Outbreak and the Fed’s Response So Far

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
The Fed.jpg

May 1, 2020—The damage to the U.S. economy resulting from the outbreak and social-distancing restrictions has started being revealed over the past few weeks. Businesses have temporarily shuttered, which has forced a drastic hit to consumer spending. The damage to labor markets was immediately seen in weekly unemployment claims figures. Now we have monthly and quarterly data trickling in confirming the dire forecasts.The most timely and striking indicator has come from the labor market.

Read More...