About the Author

Rhea Thomas

Senior Economist

Rhea is a Senior Economist at Wilmington Trust, responsible for monitoring and analyzing economic developments in domestic and international economies.

Prior to joining Wilmington Trust, Rhea served as Vice President in Foreign Exchange Sales at Lehman Brothers, where she provided primary sales coverage to institutional clients. Earlier in her career, she focused on foreign exchange research, where she helped to build models and write publications to explain currency market movements and trade ideas.

Rhea holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics and International Studies with Distinction from Yale University.


By the Author

Will Markets Get Some “Summer Loving” From the Fed?

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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June 6, 2019 – After closing out the month of May on a sour note due to sharply escalating U.S. trade tensions with both China and Mexico, the equity market rallied sharply on Tuesday in response to comments from Fed officials that were perceived as being more open to the possibility of rate cuts going forward. Chair Powell mentioned in a speech this week that the Fed would “act as appropriate to sustain the expansion,” while the St.

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Housing Market: Tentative Signs of Recovery?

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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May 22, 2019 – While 2018 was a notable year for growth in the economy, with GDP expanding at a solid pace of 2.9%, it was also notable for the lack of growth coming from the housing sector. After making modest positive contributions to annual GDP growth in each year of the recovery since 2012, investment in the housing sector by businesses and households (known as residential investment in the GDP accounts) was nearly flat in 2018 (Figure 1).

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The European Central Bank’s Dovish Surprise: Pushing on a String

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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March 8, 2019— The European Central Bank (ECB) surprised markets yesterday with an earlier-than-expected announcement of policies intended to support growth in the face of persistent downside risks to the eurozone economy. The ECB’s actions might suggest the possibility of reacceleration in the eurozone economy after a marked slowdown in 2018.

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