About the Author

Rhea Thomas

Senior Economist

Rhea is a Senior Economist at Wilmington Trust, responsible for monitoring and analyzing economic developments in domestic and international economies.

Prior to joining Wilmington Trust, Rhea served as Vice President in Foreign Exchange Sales at Lehman Brothers, where she provided primary sales coverage to institutional clients. Earlier in her career, she focused on foreign exchange research, where she helped to build models and write publications to explain currency market movements and trade ideas.

Rhea holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics and International Studies with Distinction from Yale University.


By the Author

Wage Growth: Keep an Eye Out for Under-the-Radar Measures

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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May 2, 2018—As of May 1, the U.S. economy has entered the second-longest economic expansion in its history (tied with the expansion of 1961–1969). Though “expansions don’t die of old age,” this new milestone will likely keep markets on edge watching for signs of a peak in the economic cycle. One of the key indicators frequently monitored for signs of a turn in the economy is accelerating wage growth.

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Prime-age workforce participation perks up, a potential release valve in a tight labor market

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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The latest employment report showed softer-than-expected job gains in March while wage growth edged up. This raised concerns about the possibility of the Fed having to hike rates in the face of a softening job market if upward wage pressures persist. In our view, however, there is no cause for alarm on this front. The data shows what we would expect from a maturing labor market, one in which job growth slows and wages rise gradually.

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Tariffs by the Numbers

Rhea Thomas |
Wilmington Wire
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March 13, 2018 – President Trump formally announced on March 8 the introduction of a 25% tariff on U.S.  steel imports, and a 10% tariff on aluminum imports, to be enacted in 15 days. This follows the surprise March 1 informal announcement that these tariffs were to be applied to all trading partners with no exemptions, which set off worries about potential trade wars, adding to recent market volatility.

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