About the Author

Stuart A. Smith, III

National Director, Business Value Strategies

As part of the Wilmington Trust Emerald Family Office & Advisory team, Stuart leads strategic family business advisory services at Wilmington Trust. In that capacity, he collaborates with planning and wealth management colleagues to develop comprehensive, holistic strategies and solutions for clients and prospects with family business holdings.

Prior to joining Wilmington Trust in 2019, Stuart was a managing director in the M&T Investment Banking Group, where he co-founded the Bank’s M&A/Corporate Finance business in 2001 and was co-head of the team since 2014. Stuart has more than 25 years of diversified financial services experience including senior and subordinated debt raises, private equity raises, mergers and acquisitions, and leveraged buyouts across a wide range of industries. Earlier in his career, Stuart was a director in the Consumer and Industrial Products Group at PricewaterhouseCoopers Securities, the investment banking division of PricewaterhouseCoopers. He began his career at First National Bank of Maryland in the Private Banking division.

Stuart holds an MBA from Georgetown University, where he was elected to Beta Gamma Sigma for academic achievement, and a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Virginia. He is actively involved in the Baltimore community and is currently the president of the board of trustees for the Loyola-Notre Dame Library and treasurer and board member of Gilchrist Hospice Care. He also serves on the finance committee of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Stuart formerly served in a number of capacities on the board of trustees for Integrace, Inc., a not-for-profit senior care business that was headquartered in Maryland.


By the Author

Keeping Up with the Joneses – Why Standards Matter when Selling a Business

Stuart A. Smith, III |
My Business
houses, selling a business

It’s an expression used throughout much of the English-speaking world to describe the tendency for people to compare themselves, their wealth, and their social statuses with their neighbors, friends, and colleagues. The roots of the saying may go back to the excesses of the Gilded Age as chronicled by the famed writer, Edith Wharton.  Wharton knew what she was talking about.

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How to Effectively Plan Your Business Exit Strategy

Stuart A. Smith, III |
My Business
business exit strategy

Running a business throughout a pandemic hasn’t been easy. But many business owners remain skeptical about the economy even moving beyond the pandemic. In March 2020, 57% of business owners had confidence that they would achieve their business’ long-term financial objectives, but by February 2021, only 34% still had that confidence, according to Wilmington Trust research.

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“Damn the Torpedoes” as a Business Transition Strategy

Stuart A. Smith, III |
My Business
"Cancelled Stamp From The United States Featuring Two American Naval Officers, David Farragut And David Dixon Porter.  Farragut Lived From 1801 Until 1870 And Was An Admiral On The U.S.S. Hartford.  Porter Lived From 1813 Until 1891 And Was Admiral On The U.S.S. Powhatan."

“Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!!”  There may not be a more iconic statement of the American can-do spirit. Bellowed by Admiral David Farragut on August 5, 1864 while exhorting Union naval forces in the attack on Mobile Bay, his words still resonate nearly 160 years later as a unique national expression of resolve in the face of a challenge.

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