September 22, 2020, GEM 21 — When contemplating your estate plan, you may wonder whether you should have a revocable trust, also known as a living trust, in addition to your will. The answer may depend on your net worth and the nature of your assets. Generally, the more assets you have, and the more complicated they are, the more you may benefit from a revocable trust. Chief Wealth Strategist Alvina Lo shares the key benefits of this essential estate planning tool to help you decide if it’s right for you.

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